11-Year-Old Military K9 Passes Away And Receives A Hero’s Funeral

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Each dog is a remarkable, delightful creature that’s worthy of all our love – if you’re a dog owner already, then you know that dogs just may be the most lovable goofballs on earth.

Then again, some dogs are also courageous, smart and devoted and of this, there isn’t a doubt in my mind.

These kinds of qualities are at their peak whenever it comes to the brave military and service dogs that protect our safety every day, and often risk their own lives for all of us.

Every dog deserves to be treated with dignity, however service dogs deserve to be treated with dignity and respect, too.

Anytime one of these courageous soldiers passes on, it’s only fitting that they be provided with a hero’s burial.

For the family that adopted a beautiful military K9 named Nero, that’s precisely what they decided to do to honor his passing.

In late October of 2016, Nero passed away, but not without the proper recognition.

As a matter of fact, this brave dog received every last accolade that he deserved for his bravery and heroism.

This gorgeous boy is Nero, a German Shepherd who served in the military and passed away at the end of October, 2016.

After he served in Afghanistan as CWD (Contract Working Dog), he was taken in by an organization in Texas called Mission K9 Rescue. Mission K9 Rescue rescues and re-homes military dogs when they come back home.

Nero just happened to be the very first dog that the rescue took in when he returned from Afghanistan, and they found him a very happy home.

According to Mission K9 Rescue’s Facebook page, Nero was taken home by his mom, Judie, right after he returned from his tour overseas.

Nero lived with his mom for two happy years, and during that time he was given all the love and affection he could ever have wanted.

In a statement to Mission K9, Judie wrote, “May God bless you and hold you dear for your brave and wonderful heart.”

Nero worked hard keeping this country safe, by serving as  CWD for seven years.

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